life sciences

NSF Science Now: Episode 53

In this week's episode, we discover a new species of titanosaurian dinosaur and how airline boarding procedures might be making you sick; we explore a compact mass spectrometer for use in the field; and finally, we learn how vertebrate tails actually provide greater speed

Naked and Amazing--the real reality show

On this episode of "Naked and Amazing," researchers discover that naked mole rats may have a hidden secret that could help improve life for millions of people all over the globe!

Fertilizer genomics

DNA analysis reveals "kingpin" genes, master regulators in networks of genes that take up the nitrogen in fertilizer

Bug battles

With support from the National Science Foundation, University of Florida entomologist Christine Miller and her team are researching mate selection and animal weapons as a key to better understanding animal behavior, diversity and evolution

Purdue’s new adhesive flexes its mussels

A nontoxic glue modeled after adhesive proteins produced by mussels and other creatures has been found to outperform commercially available products, pointing toward potential surgical glues to replace sutures and staples

Chimpanzees offer clues to Alzheimer's disease

A National Science Foundation-funded study led by Kent State University found that the brains of aged chimpanzees, our closest living relatives, show similarities to brains effected by the human Alzheimer's disease

Off-roading: Salt content rises in freshwater lakes

National Science Foundation-funded researchers affiliated with the Global Lake Ecological Observatory Network discover an issue with road salt used to melt away snow and ice. Turns out, it's contributing to rising salinity in many North American freshwater lakes.

Digital eye in the sky

David Johnson, assistant professor of the practice of marine conservation ecology at Duke University, has found that drone technology allows his research team to collect huge volumes of data from remote or extreme locations

Palau coral reefs have a global impact

Humans are adding carbon dioxide to the atmosphere by burning fossil fuels and deforestation. Through a process called ocean acidification, about a quarter to a third of this carbon dioxide is absorbed by the ocean, causing a decrease in the pH of ocean water