Technology & Engineering

Technology and Engineering bridge the gap between what the mind can imagine and what the laws of nature allow. While scientists seek to discover what is not yet known, engineers apply fundamental science to design and develop new devices and systems—technology—to solve societal problems. Technological and engineering innovations then return the favor by affecting human—as well as other animal species'—the ability to control and adapt to their natural environments.

An augmented view

Researchers are applying augmented reality to improve ultrasounds for both patient and physician

Shark acceleration research

Students in the Small Hall maker space at William & Mary create devices for Virginia Institute of Marine Science professor Kevin Weng to use in his shark research at the Eastern Shore Lab.

NSF Science Now: Episode 47

In this week's episode, we learn about new tools to protect against malicious websites, restoring the sense of touch to amputees and those with paralysis and examine how older adults really hear.

Big ideas for future NSF investments

Six research "big ideas" that will drive important aspects of the National Science Foundation's long-term research agenda, push forward the frontiers of US science and engineering research, and lead to new discoveries and innovations.

NSF-funded biofuel research at Kansas State

Meng "Peter" Zhang, visiting assistant professor of industrial and manufacturing systems engineering at Kansas State University, describes his National Science Foundation-funded biofuel manufacturing research.

Turn your eyes to the skies for the latest explorers

In episode 68, Charlie and Jordan head outdoors to show how National Science Foundation-supported researchers are finding new ways to use small, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs)--also known as drones--to gather data, improve communication and explore environments where humans and larger aircraft dare not go.

Energy harvesting computers: extracting energy from the environment

Brandon Lucia, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering at Carnegie Mellon University, designs the basic technology to support "energy harvesting computers," or devices that can perform computations, sense their environments and communicate using energy that they extract from their environments.