Physics

Physics is the science of matter, energy, space and time. It looks both inward and outward, from the smallest subatomic particle to the vastness of the universe—and yet it is also intensely practical. Physics begins with the everyday physical world around us—the blue of the sky, the colors of the rainbow, the fall of an apple, the motions of the moon. What's happening here? Why do things work this way?

Humanexus

This multiple award-winning semi-documentary animation visualizes human communication from the Stone Age to today and beyond

What's the difference between fermions and bosons?

In particle physics, there are many different types of particles, mostly ending with the phrase "-on." Don Lincoln a senior physicist at Fermilab talks about fermions and bosons and what is the key difference between these two particles.

Editors' pick: The universe waves hello

In this editors' pick video for the Best Of the National Science Foundation's Science360 2016, Charlie and Jordan explore the biggest news story of our century so far: the detection of gravitational waves.

Supercomputers solve case of missing galaxies

California Institute of Technology (Caltech) associate professor of theoretical astrophysics Phil Hopkins and Carnegie-Caltech Research Fellow Andrew Wetzel use massive supercomputers to build the most detailed and realistic simulation of galaxy formation ever created.

The nature of matter

If there's one thing that we think we understand, it's matter. After all, matter makes up everything around us; it even makes up you. However, all is not as it seems.

Why does time advance? Richard Muller's new theory

A simple question from his wife -- Does physics really allow people to travel back in time? -- propelled physicist Richard Muller on a quest to resolve a fundamental problem that had puzzled him throughout his 45-year career: Why does the arrow of time flow inexorably toward the future, constantly creating new "nows"?

Meet a geophysicist

Postdoctoral Research Fellow from Arizona State University, Harmony Colella, talks about how experiencing an earthquake as a child in Southern California inspired her to become a geophysicist.

Meet a geophysicist: Danielle Sumy

When she was very young, Danielle Sumy's experience on the Earthquake ride at Universal Studios launched her quest to understand how earthquakes happen. Here she describes how this encounter and her early love of science motivated her to become a geophysicist.