Physics

Physics is the science of matter, energy, space and time. It looks both inward and outward, from the smallest subatomic particle to the vastness of the universe—and yet it is also intensely practical. Physics begins with the everyday physical world around us—the blue of the sky, the colors of the rainbow, the fall of an apple, the motions of the moon. What's happening here? Why do things work this way?

Meet a geophysicist

Postdoctoral Research Fellow from Arizona State University, Harmony Colella, talks about how experiencing an earthquake as a child in Southern California inspired her to become a geophysicist.

Meet a geophysicist: Danielle Sumy

When she was very young, Danielle Sumy's experience on the Earthquake ride at Universal Studios launched her quest to understand how earthquakes happen. Here she describes how this encounter and her early love of science motivated her to become a geophysicist.

Volcano research: Emily Hooft

Emilie describes her work as a geophysicist, the physics she uses to better understand the forces that make volcanoes work, and how seismic data can help image the magma structures beneath them

A brief intro to quantum computing

Harvard professor Amir Yacoby explains the emergence of quantum computing as an outcome of two 20th century innovations -- quantum mechanics and computer science -- and shows why it has the potential to tackle hard problems that would take today's computers billions of years to solve.

The nanostructure problem

In order to see inside nanomaterials and learn how nanoparticles evolve, Simon Billinge applies the world's newest and brightest synchrotron light source -- the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. at Brookhaven

When protons collide

A proton collision is like a car accident--except when it isn't. Boston University physicist Kevin Black explains why. (Watch out for the kitchen sink!)

Quantum field theory

The subatomic world has long been known to be truly mind-bending, with particles that are waves and vice versa. Cats are alive and dead and everything is governed by probability.

Are invisibility cloaks possible?

Have you ever wished you could hide under an invisibility cloak like Harry Potter or conceal your car with a Klingon cloaking device like in "Star Trek"?

Einstein's clocks

In this video, Fermilab's Don Lincoln shows that every single day particle physicists prove that moving clocks tick more slowly than stationary ones.

Large scale graphene production

Draw a line with a pencil and it's likely that somewhere along that black smudge is a material that earned two scientists the 2010 Nobel Prize in Physics.

Dancing droplets (audio only)

Watch as coalescing droplets dance themselves off of hydrophobic thin fibers, a new phenomenon first witnessed at Duke University

GUTs and TOEs

Albert Einstein said that what he wanted to know was "God's thoughts," which is a metaphor for the ultimate and most basic rules of the universe.

Big mysteries: dark energy

Scientists were shocked in 1998 when the expansion of the universe wasn't slowing down as expected by our best understanding of gravity at the time; the expansion was speeding up!

The pentaquark

In episode 20, Charlie and Jordan chat about rising sea levels, biodegradable "smart" implants and the existence of the pentaquark.