Physics

Physics is the science of matter, energy, space and time. It looks both inward and outward, from the smallest subatomic particle to the vastness of the universe—and yet it is also intensely practical. Physics begins with the everyday physical world around us—the blue of the sky, the colors of the rainbow, the fall of an apple, the motions of the moon. What's happening here? Why do things work this way?

Need for speed

National Science Foundation-funded research sheds new light on the role of the tail in locomotion

Batlab studies echolocation to learn how animals 'see' with sound

Neuroscientist Cindy Moss is investigating how animals use sensory information to guide their behavior. Her team at Johns Hopkins University's "Batlab" is currently focused on bat echolocation -- high frequency sonar calls a bat uses to determine the location of objects in its environment

How mosquitoes get away

Scientists have found the key to mosquitoes' stealth takeoffs: They barely push off when making a fast getaway, but instead rely on strong and rapid wing beats to quickly get aloft without anyone noticing

Is the universe infinite and will it last forever?

Is the universe infinite and will it last forever? Saul Perlmutter, a professor of physics at the University of California, Berkeley, answers your question in this special "Mysteries of the Cosmos" edition of Ask a Scientist

NSF Science Now: Episode 53

In this week's episode, we discover a new species of titanosaurian dinosaur and how airline boarding procedures might be making you sick; we explore a compact mass spectrometer for use in the field; and finally, we learn how vertebrate tails actually provide greater speed

Ripples of gravity, flashes of light

On Aug. 17, 2017, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) and Virgo detected, for the first time, gravitational waves from the collision of two neutron stars

Ferroelectret technology puts more than just pep in your step

The ferroelectret nanogenerator (FENG) device, an ultra-thin magnetic polymer film developed by Nelson Sepúlveda, associate professor of electrical and computer engineering at Michigan State University, is able to capture the energy generated through movement

Electromagnets unwire the framework of small, foldable robots

A team of researchers at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and the John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) at Harvard University has created battery-free folding robots that are capable of complex, repeatable movements powered and controlled through a wireless magnetic field