People & Society

Out of fascination and need, people have always studied other people. When scientific methods are applied to those observations, the studies help characterize and analyze our behavior, social and political institutions, family and community structures and our economies. Scientific studies of people and society help answer age-old human contemplations.

How babies retain information

It's no secret that reading to children is essential for their optimal brain development, but a National Science Foundation-funded research team, led by Lisa Scott at the University of Florida, has discovered that reading books that name and label people and objects are even better

Battling wildfires with data-driven knowledge

San Diego Supercomputer Center's chief data science officer Ilkay Altintas describes a National Science Foundation-funded project that uses data-driven knowledge and predictive tools to battle wildfires, such as those that destroyed thousands of homes and businesses in 2017

ScienCast: Learning to trust robots

Yue Wang at Clemson University is building robots that people can trust by teaching them how to learn and interpret human behaviors and react accordingly

NSF Science Now: Episode 55

In this week's episode, we learn how infants retain information; how loud noise can affect birds; the underpinnings of snake locomotion and, finally, the existence of a hitherto unknown ancient Native American population

Lights out!

Our cities are very congested, much of which stems from traffic lights. If we can reduce that congestion and harmonize traffic with lights, we can contribute to more efficient, cleaner cities.

Fighting brain drain with a game

One of the two brain-training methods most scientists use in research is significantly better in improving memory and attention, Johns Hopkins University researchers found