People & Society

Out of fascination and need, people have always studied other people. When scientific methods are applied to those observations, the studies help characterize and analyze our behavior, social and political institutions, family and community structures and our economies. Scientific studies of people and society help answer age-old human contemplations.

Tanana, Alaska: Connecting food, energy and water

The Tanana community is one of four selected for participation in the National Science Foundation project, "Coupling infrastructure improvements to food-energy-water system dynamics in small cold region communities: MicroFEWs"

Cordova, Alaska: Connecting food, energy and water

The Cordova community is one of four selected for participation in the National Science Foundation project, "Coupling infrastructure improvements to food-energy-water system dynamics in small cold region communities: MicroFEWs"

The Changing Arctic 

Researchers funded by the National Science Foundation are helping understand changes in the Arctic, from incorporating the unique perspectives of indigenous communities in the Arctic and subarctic to developing new technologies that collect more data to assist with better modeling

Maine tends growing STEM collaborative

The Maine Center for Research in STEM Education, or RiSE Center, at the University of Maine connects with educators statewide, at all levels, to advance innovative and engaging hands-on teaching and learning

What is neuroethics?

What is neuroethics? Tim Brown, doctoral candidate and research assistant at University of Washington's Center for Neurotechnology, answers the question on this edition of "Ask a Scientist."

3D printed objects that can track and store information

Vikram Iyer, doctoral student in the University of Washington's Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, demonstrates 3D printed devices that can track and store information about their use without using batteries or electronics

Trick neurons with the Stroop Test

Researchers in the Adolphs laboratory at Caltech have discovered that certain types of neurons called error neurons are more active when we make a mistake. Take the Stroop test and see how you fare

Why does group categorization matter?

Why does group categorization matter? Kristina Olson, associate professor of psychology at University of Washington and 2018 Alan T. Waterman Award recipient, answers the question on this edition of "Ask a Scientist."