Medical Sciences

Medical Sciences advance the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of disease, but they also help us prevent disease in the first place. Too numerous to name, the medical sciences continuously make miraculous breakthroughs that extend lifetimes and expand our ability to experience life.

New 'Neural Dust' sensor could be implanted in the body

University of California, Berkeley engineers have built the first dust-sized, wireless sensors that can be implanted in the body, bringing closer the day when a Fitbit-like device could monitor internal nerves, muscles or organs in real time.

NSF Science Now: Episode 45

In this episode, we tested out a computational design tool that transforms flat materials into 3-D shapes, a virtual reality environment that is helping autistic teens learn to drive, a new novel underwater microscope and, finally, "smart thread" for wirelessly monitoring the health of a wound.

Jessica Winter: From chemical engineer to cancer warrior

At the age of 35, Jessica Winter found out she had breast cancer. Her response? Invent a new nanotechnology for pinpoint diagnosis and personalized medicine; then, recruit allies and investors to scale up production for clinical use.

To purify a virus

A new theory about virus surfaces--that they're hydrophobic--has opened up new processes to improve vaccine production, potentially making them more affordable around the world.

How can mussels improve fetal surgery?

University of California, Berkeley, engineer Phillip Messersmith is happy to be learning lessons from a lowly mollusk, with the expectation that the knowledge gained will enable him and fellow physicians to prevent deaths among their youngest patients -- those who haven't been born yet.

NSF Science Now: Episode 44

In this week's episode we examine electric eels, test out a new at home screening test for people on blood thinner, learn about a new app for reporting floods and finally examine how RoboBee uses static electricity to stick to surfaces.

Strut your stuff

In episode 52, Jordan and Charlie discuss research discovered using new high-resolution microscopy by a team at the University of Pennsylvania. Molecular struts, called microtubules, interact with the heart's contractile machinery to provide mechanical resistance for the beating of the heart.

Nifty 50

Jordan and Charlie celebrate 50 episodes with 50 National Science Foundation-funded breakthroughs, discoveries, achievements and generally amazing contributions to science.

Treating strokes with chemistry

In episode 49, Charlie and Jordan talk about a molecule that can inhibit an enzyme linked with the onset of stroke. The molecule -- developed by research teams at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and the National University of Singapore -- reduced the death of brain tissue by as much as sixty-six percent when given to a rat that had recently suffered a stroke.

'Go Baby Go!' Mobility for kids with disabilities

The exploration experiences that children have at an early age play an important role in cognitive development. A research team from the University of Delaware, led by physical therapy professor Cole Galloway, is working on ways to help infants with walking and crawling issues have those kinds of experiences.

Micro-fabrication for cochlear implants

Angelique Johnson is the CEO of MEMStim, a company that is innovating how electrode arrays in cochlear implants are manufactured. Using automated micro-fabrication, instead of costly hand-made manufacturing, Johnson is able to lower the cost of production, allowing more people in need of implants to afford them.

Contact tracing

What is Contact Tracing, and how does it help control the spread of deadly, infectious diseases?