Medical Sciences

Medical Sciences advance the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of disease, but they also help us prevent disease in the first place. Too numerous to name, the medical sciences continuously make miraculous breakthroughs that extend lifetimes and expand our ability to experience life.

The genetic path to biodiversity

With support from the National Science Foundation, developmental biologist Arnaud Martin and his team at George Washington University are using cutting-edge genomic techniques, such as CRISPR, to better understand how the rich stripes and swirls of a butterfly's wing take their shape

Butterfly cam catches cancer

National Science Foundation-funded researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Washington University in St. Louis have developed a surgical camera inspired by the eye of the Morpho butterfly to more accurately find lurking cancer

A cheaper, easier way to test for Malaria

For many in sub-saharan Africa, finding out if a fever is due to Malaria often means trekking long miles to a clinic for a relatively pricey blood test, and anxious hours of waiting before the results come in -- the Urine Malaria Test kit developed by Fyodor Biotechnologies has begun to change all that

Cellular shuffle

Researchers at the University of Washington and the Allen Institute for Brain Science have developed a new method to classify and track the multitude of cells in a tissue sample

Understanding the gut microbiome

Larry Smarr and Rob Knight hope to help make the three P's of modern medicine - precision, predictive and personalized -- a reality with the aid of advanced computers to create high-resolution mapping and simulations like never before

Why study mouse lemurs?

The Duke Lemur Center's non-invasive research on mouse lemurs, our tiny primate cousins, could help explain the initial stages of Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases

Can tiny medical implants treat disease?

Tiny electronic devices, sometimes called electroceuticals, could be placed alongside vital organs in the human body to take sensor readings, deliver tiny amounts of drugs, provide remedial jolts of electricity or combinations of the above