K-12 & Education

It's a competitive world in which science, technology, mathematics and engineering impact our economy, health, societal well-being and policy. Scientists, engineers and educators provide the ideas and knowledge base for U.S. leadership in science and engineering. Learning how people learn, while also supporting the very best ideas and students are also essential goals in today's changing world.

Finding nirvana in pure math

"I'm still that nerdy, geeky kid that I was in school living inside my own imagination, but I'm coming out of my shell," says Kaavya Valiveti, 21, winner of UC Berkeley's coveted University Medal, which recognizes outstanding scholarship, public service and strength of character.

NSF CAREER Award aids research on STEM teaching

A University of Nebraska-Lincoln researcher is helping faculty become better instructors with the goal of improving students' education in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, collectively known as STEM.

Pingpong balls break the sound barrier

Mechanical engineering and technology students at Purdue University built a supersonic, air-powered cannon that shoots pingpong balls at speeds so fast they break the sound barrier.

Beyond the classroom and into the future

This video visually explains the Stark State College project's approach to broadening science, technology, engineering and math participation. Through addressing the root causes of the problem, a perpetual solution has been created that will impact the entire community.

STEM-demic outbreak

Stark State College Chemistry Club students mentor Hoover High School Chemistry Club Students during Science Technology Engineering and Math (STEM) outreach events at Canton City after-school care program for kids in K-5.

Life on the (urban) farm

In episode 27, Jordan and Charlie discuss a new mammilian fossils find in New Mexico, Using molecular analysis to clarify dinosaur colors and the Urban Hydrofarmers Project.

Broadening student's participation in STEM

This video addresses the problem of broadening participation in science, technology, engineering and math by proposing to develop a role-playing video game. Researchers believe their solution holds the potential to address the issue within an ideal age range and over a culturally diverse populace.

Nerd stuff

In episode 25, Charlie and Jordan examine a rare nautiluses (not seen in 30 years), how to fold a shell and enrolling more girls in computer science classes.

The math of shark skin

The rough surface of shark skin helps sharks move faster through the water. Mathematicians have developed an equation for how this roughness translates into less viscosity for a swimming shark.

Researcher shines light on origin of bioluminescence

A scientist has discovered that bioluminescence may not have originated as a means to ward off predators, but instead evolved as a way to survive in harsh climates--at least in one millipede. The finding, based on the discovery of a millipede that hadn't been seen in 50 years, shows that even the seemingly most complex and intricate of traits can be traced in evolution as small steps leading to a complex feature we see today.