Earth & Environment

The "third rock from the Sun"—Earth. With an orbit neither too close nor too far from the Sun, it occupies a unique position in the Solar System. It's the only planet known to man with the right conditions for the origin and evolution of life. During Earth's 4.5 billion-year history, a combination of processes has transformed it into a watery blue, living planet. The Earth's ecosystems involve complex interactions between the biological (living) and physical (non-living) worlds. Scientific research helps us comprehend our effects on the environment and how the environment in turn responds to impacts of our activities.

Urban heat island: Improving data for sustainable cities

This video is part of "Changes and Choices in the Yahara," a mini-documentary series showcasing the major research implications from the University of Wisconsin-Madison Water Sustainability and Climate project, a five-year research endeavor funded by the National Science Foundation.

Groundwater and agriculture: tapping the hidden benefits

This video is part of "Changes and Choices in the Yahara," a mini-documentary series showcasing the major research implications from the University of Wisconsin-Madison Water Sustainability and Climate project, a five-year research endeavor funded by the National Science Foundation.

Agriculture

Soil salinization prevents crops from taking up water and nutrients due to an excess of salt in the soil. Meagan Mauter at Carnegie Mellon University is developing technology to monitor salinity levels to allow farmers to make better watering decisions.

Wastewater

Wastewater is what gets flushed down the toilet, rinsed down the drain, and produced by places such as factories, workplaces, and homes. Kartik Chandran at Columbia University is changing the perception of wastewater by treating it more efficiently and creating energy from resources found in it.

It's a twister--of data!

In episode 75, Charlie and Jordan talk about visualizations developed by Amy McGovern at the University of Oklahoma, that may reduce the false alarm rate for tornado prediction.

Landscape analyses: Getting the most from our landscapes

This video is part of "Changes and Choices in the Yahara," a mini-documentary series showcasing the major research implications from the University of Wisconsin-Madison Water Sustainability and Climate (WSC) project, a five-year research endeavor funded by the National Science Foundation.

Are we a sixth extinction?

Stanford University Earth professor Jon Payne puts modern extinction in context by comparing them with Earth's five previous mass extinctions.

Scenarios: building resilience with long-term thinking

This video is part of "Changes and Choices in the Yahara," a mini-documentary series showcasing the major research implications from the University of Wisconsin-Madison Water Sustainability and Climate (WSC) project, a five-year research endeavor funded by the National Science Foundation.

Policy and governance: innovating for clean water results

This video is part of "Changes and Choices in the Yahara," a mini-documentary series showcasing the major research implications from the UW-Madison Water Sustainability and Climate project, a five-year research endeavor funded by the National Science Foundation.

Computing for sustainability

Electrical and computer engineering professor at Carnegie Mellon University, Diana Marculescu, talks about computing for sustainability

What is the Water Sustainability and Climate Project?

In this video, the research team explains the Water Sustainability and Climate Project, which was focused on how to achieve water sustainability for current and future generations, given ongoing changes in climate, land use, and human demands.

Saving Atlantis: Global Coral Microbiome Project, Mo’orea

As part of a feature film project Saving Atlantis, researchers at Oregon State University journeyed to Mo'orea, French Polynesia with scientists from the Global Coral Microbiome Project. This segment explains the interaction between coral reefs and humans.

Carbon flux explorers

Jim Bishop, senior scientist at Berkeley Lab and professor at the University of California, Berkeley, is leading a project to deploy robotic floats that provide data on how microorganisms sequester carbon in the ocean.