Chemistry

If you have an interest in anything in the world, then you have an interest in chemistry because everything you hear, see, taste, smell and touch involves chemistry and chemicals. Our ability to understand the chemical make-up of things and chemical reactions has led to everything from modern food and drugs to plastics and computers.

Polyploidy

A team of three scientists from Kansas State University, Michigan State University and the Desert Botanical Garden are investigating polyploidy (the condition of having more than one set of chromosomes) and diversity in the plant genus Phlox (Polemoniaceae).

NSF Science Now: Episode 51

In this week's episode, we learn about marine mammals' need for speed, magnify a new tool combating mosquito-borne disease, break down new materials inspired by kirigami, and finally, discover new hydrothermal vents. Check it out!

Cell migration

Cells move and migrate to new locations in the bodies of developing animals, an important step for the correct formation and function of organs. The research featured in this video uses a simple genetic model, the fruit fly, to investigate how cells move as organized groups within the animal. This video is part of a series produced by students at Kansas State University.

What's the difference between fermions and bosons?

In particle physics, there are many different types of particles, mostly ending with the phrase "-on." Don Lincoln a senior physicist at Fermilab talks about fermions and bosons and what is the key difference between these two particles.

Putting graphene to the test

Graphene has the potential to improve electronics, solar cells and other devices. University of Nebraska, Lincoln, chemist Alexander Sinitskii is testing this promising nanomaterial with a National Science Foundation CAREER award.

Treating strokes with chemistry

In episode 49, Charlie and Jordan talk about a molecule that can inhibit an enzyme linked with the onset of stroke. The molecule -- developed by research teams at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and the National University of Singapore -- reduced the death of brain tissue by as much as sixty-six percent when given to a rat that had recently suffered a stroke.

Large scale graphene production

Draw a line with a pencil and it's likely that somewhere along that black smudge is a material that earned two scientists the 2010 Nobel Prize in Physics.

Viral nanostructures for enhanced boiling

Scientists have found a way to harness droves of viruses, found on tobacco plants, as the building blocks for a new super-absorbent coating for use on a variety of materials. These nano-coatings are helping us better understand things like boiling and condensation.

What pennies reveal about randomness

Salvatore Torquato, professor of chemistry at Princeton University, explains his research on the theoretical packing of pennies and how it provides new insights on the nature of randomness.