Chemistry

If you have an interest in anything in the world, then you have an interest in chemistry because everything you hear, see, taste, smell and touch involves chemistry and chemicals. Our ability to understand the chemical make-up of things and chemical reactions has led to everything from modern food and drugs to plastics and computers.

The genetic path to biodiversity

With support from the National Science Foundation, developmental biologist Arnaud Martin and his team at George Washington University are using cutting-edge genomic techniques, such as CRISPR, to better understand how the rich stripes and swirls of a butterfly's wing take their shape

Cellular shuffle

Researchers at the University of Washington and the Allen Institute for Brain Science have developed a new method to classify and track the multitude of cells in a tissue sample

Marilyn Minus: From slime to super fiber

Northeastern Professor Marilyn Minus wants to make the strongest fibers the world has ever known -- at low cost -- for light-weight bullet-proof armor, wide-body jets, sports gear and more.

Heavy nitrogen molecules reveal planetary-scale tug-of-war

Rice University scientist Laurence Yeung, along with scientists at University of California Los Angeles, Michigan State University and the University of New Mexico, counted rare molecules in the atmosphere that contain only heavy isotopes of nitrogen, and discovered a planetary-scale tug-of-war between life, the deep Earth and the upper atmosphere

Building a quantum computer with atomic ions

Two independent teams of scientists, including one from the Joint Quantum Institute, have used more than 50 interacting atomic qubits to mimic magnetic quantum matter, surpassing the complexity of previous demonstrations

Secrets of butterfly wings revealed!

George Washington University evolutionary geneticist Arnaud Martin is using CRISPR Cas9, a gene editing technique, to determine how changes in the "painting gene" WntA result in different wing shapes and patterns in butterflies