Biology

What is this thing called life? Biologists are life's detectives, discovering how life works and what makes animals, plants and microbes "alive." Organisms don't remain the same forever. Without change, life on Earth would stagnate. Species are in a constant dance with their environment. When an environment changes, the species that live within must change too, evolving to better adapt in order to survive. The end result is the diversity of life we see around us.

Image modeling for biomedical organs

Professor Jessica Zhang discusses the interdisciplinary nature of the Bioengineered Organs Imitative and how her research in mechanical engineering can contribute to the initiative.

Early primate ancestor may have come from North America

New research by University of Florida doctoral graduate Paul Morse shows that Teilhardina brandti, a species found in Wyoming, is as old or older than its Asian and European relatives, upending the prevailing hypothesis that this early primate first appeared in China

New genomic resource is sweet science for tomatoes

Researchers from Boyce Thompson Institute and colleagues from partnering institutions have created a pan-genome, establishing a resource that promises to help breeders develop more flavorful and sustainable tomato varieties

How bees recognize nest mates

New research shows that honey bees (Apis mellifera) develop different scent profiles as they age, and the gatekeeper bees at the hive's door respond differently to returning foragers than when they encounter younger bees who have never ventured out

Crops versus wild

This video describes a food chain that extends from consumers, producers, breeders and the wild crop relatives that breeders depend on for crop improvement.

Tomato crops hinge on adaptation and biodiversity

A team of researchers visits a seed bank, the Tomato Genetics Resource Center, where scientists try to preserve the genetic diversity available in wild tomato relatives and make it available for crop breeders

The role of the hippocampus in discerning memory

Without an intact hippocampus, forming new memories is impossible. Researchers from Arizona State University and Stanford University have found an equally important role for the hippocampus: feeding information to brain areas responsible for learning