NSF's Science360 Super Science Show

Co-editors of NSF’s Science360 News Service, Charlie Heck and Jordan D'Eri, bring you a weekly, well almost weekly, recap of some of the top NSF-funded news stories.

Nuclear CSI

In episode 73, Jordan and Charlie investigate a new procedure for identifying individuals exposed to uranium within the past year. Scientists and homeland security experts believe these procedures could identify individuals who may be smuggling nuclear materials for criminal purposes.

Editors' pick: The universe waves hello

In this editors' pick video for the Best Of the National Science Foundation's Science360 2016, Charlie and Jordan explore the biggest news story of our century so far: the detection of gravitational waves.

Turn your eyes to the skies for the latest explorers

In episode 68, Charlie and Jordan head outdoors to show how National Science Foundation-supported researchers are finding new ways to use small, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs)--also known as drones--to gather data, improve communication and explore environments where humans and larger aircraft dare not go.

Needles that hit the right mark

In episode 66, Charlie and Jordan talk about a new sensor that could help anesthesiologists better place needles for epidurals and other medical procedures.

Breaking summer records

In episode 60, Charlie and Jordan return from summer break to investigate the future of summers. According to NSF-funded research at NCAR, in 50 years, summers across most of the globe could be hotter than any other experienced by people, ever.

NSF Science360 Super Science Rewind: Strut your stuff

In this Super Science Rewind, Jordan and Charlie discuss research discovered using new high-resolution microscopy by a team at the University of Pennsylvania. Molecular struts, called microtubules, interact with the heart's contractile machinery to provide mechanical resistance for the beating of the heart.