Technology & Engineering

Technology and Engineering bridge the gap between what the mind can imagine and what the laws of nature allow. While scientists seek to discover what is not yet known, engineers apply fundamental science to design and develop new devices and systems—technology—to solve societal problems. Technological and engineering innovations then return the favor by affecting human—as well as other animal species'—the ability to control and adapt to their natural environments.

The JetYak

WHOI engineers develop a new type of ocean robot

Applied biosensors

NSF-funded small business Applied Biosensors has created sensors that continuously monitor multiple biomarkers. The core technology has implications for biomedical research, water quality management and metabolic monitoring, among others.

Cybersecurity

Researchers work to counter a new class of coffee shop hackers

NSF Science Now: Episode 30

Hosted by NSF's Dena Headlee, Science Now is a weekly newscast covering some of the latest in NSF-funded innovation and advances across all areas and disciplines, from astronomy to zoology. This fast paced, news round-up reports many of the week's top stories.

Making it break

Before a new material can succeed as a structural component, it must fail.

New technology makes tissues, someday organs

A new device for assembling large tissues from living components could someday be used to build replacement human organs the way electronics are assembled today: with precise picking and placing of parts.

Self-powered device measures lung function - CES 2015

A portable device powered by a simple breath can measure lung function and transmit results to your phone. The 3-D printed device is designed to enable people with lung conditions, such as asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), to gauge their lung function without having to visit a clinic.

Expansion Microscopy brings the brain in 3-D into focus

Illuminating the brain and nervous system is one of today's greatest engineering challenges. A new technique called expansion microscopy uses chemicals commonly found in baby diapers to swell mouse brain tissue samples with water to nearly five times the usual size, with little distortion.