People & Society

Out of fascination and need, people have always studied other people. When scientific methods are applied to those observations, the studies help characterize and analyze our behavior, social and political institutions, family and community structures and our economies. Scientific studies of people and society help answer age-old human contemplations.

NSF Science Now: Episode 22

NSF Science Now: Episode 22

In this week's episode we discover hidden dangers in crib mattresses. We learn about a new stretchable antenna for wearable health monitoring devices. We study the dynamics of deep Earth and finally we explore Antarctic ice sheets from above.

Ana Sirovic in 99 seconds

Ana Sirovic in 99 seconds

Marine acoustician Ana Sirovic describes her career and a potential danger to marine life that is only beginning to be understood

A forest after fire

A forest after fire

Year after year massive fires continue to rip through the wildland-urban interface in Colorado, but in the face of climate change and a warming climate, our beloved forests might not return after these catastrophic events.

NSF Science Now: Episode 18

NSF Science Now: Episode 18

In this week's episode we dig up the "King of Gore," the oldest discovered Tyrannosaurid dinosaur yet. We also learn how ordinary foam can help protect athletes from concussions and how a tongue-controlled wheelchair could give people with paralysis more independence. Check it out!

NSF Science Now Episode 17

NSF Science Now Episode 17

This week's episode explores silicon chip technology that could possibly extend cell phone battery life, babies and higher math ability, a drone helping farmers better manage their crops, and finally how more than 83,000 volunteer citizen scientists helped an international research team catalog over 300,000 nearby galaxies.

Tyrian purple

Tyrian purple

Nina Ruelle tells the story of Tyrian Purple, a dye created from the marine snail known as Bolinus brandaris

NSF Science Now: Episode 16

NSF Science Now: Episode 16

This week's episode highlights wireless monitors, Antarctic glacier melt, S&E employment and finally a volcano discovery

Sustainability: Water - Los Angeles & water imports

Sustainability: Water - Los Angeles & water imports

The nearly 10 million people in the city and county of Los Angeles, California require a lot of water - most of which is imported snow melt from the Eastern Sierra Nevadas and Rocky Mountains, hundreds of miles away. UCLA researchers Stephanie Pincetl and Mark Gold are studying how Los Angeles can reduce its water imports and better capture, store and reuse water for a more sustainable water supply.

NSF Science Now: Episode 15

NSF Science Now: Episode 15

This week's episode of Science Now highlights the University of Minnesota's mind controlling robot that could potentially help people who are paralyzed or have neurodegenerative diseases, PolarTREC's FishSpy camera capturing life beneath the frigid waters surrounding Antarctica, a shake table test on the world's largest shake table and finally the discovery of the earliest European fort found in the foothills of North Carolina.