People & Society

Out of fascination and need, people have always studied other people. When scientific methods are applied to those observations, the studies help characterize and analyze our behavior, social and political institutions, family and community structures and our economies. Scientific studies of people and society help answer age-old human contemplations.

Your home's microbiom moves with you

The Home Microbiome Project is an initiative aimed at uncovering the dynamic co-associations between people's bacteria and the bacteria found in their homes. The hope is that the data and project will show that routine monitoring of the microbial diversity of your body and of the environment in which you live is possible.

NSF Science Now: Episode 36

In this week's episode, we discover a protein that could someday eliminate malaria, learn about microbes battling it out in Antarctica, explore super Wi-Fi that uses UHF channels and virtually unwrap a 1500-year-old scroll.

Clearing feeding tubes faster: biotech's future

Feeding tubes often become clogged with medication and food, depriving patients of nutrition. National Science Foundation-funded small business Actuated Medical has invented an FDA-approved device that clears clogs quickly and cleanly. Roger Bagwell demonstrated how the device works at the 2014 BIO International Convention.

ApneApp

ApneaApp is a solution for detecting sleep apnea events on a smartphone.

An in-mouth wafer to treat oral cancer

To treat oral cancer, NSF-funded small business Privo Technologies has created a platform that delivers treatments directly to the affected area. Privo develops new classes of targeted treatments, such as chemotherapy drugs, designed to be delivered through the mouth's mucous membranes.

NSF Science Now: Episode 35

Hosted by NSF's Dena Headlee, Science Now is a weekly newscast covering some of the latest in NSF-funded innovation and advances across all areas and disciplines, from astronomy to zoology. This fast paced, news round-up reports many of the week's top stories.

Revolutionizing prosthesis prescription

Steve Collins of the Mechanical Engineering Department at Carnegie Mellon University discusses his lab's work in creating robots that are worn on the leg to help people get around.

Do social insects share brain power?

The society you live in can shape the complexity of your brain. For vertebrate animals like humans, and even birds and fish, there is a lot of support for the idea that our complex brains developed along with complex societies.

Internet insecurity

Sharon Goldberg, a Boston University College of Arts & Sciences assistant professor of computer science, breaks down Border Gateway Protocol, which she describes as "the glue that holds the Internet together."