Medical Sciences

Medical Sciences advance the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of disease, but they also help us prevent disease in the first place. Too numerous to name, the medical sciences continuously make miraculous breakthroughs that extend lifetimes and expand our ability to experience life.

Antibiotic resistant bacteria

An engineer's research to understand how bacteria and antibiotics interact in the environment may one day help reduce the danger of antibiotic-resistant bacteria to the public

Stent research

The cure for a serious heart condition could be found with the help of research at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Ouch-free medical tape

Bioengineers create new medical bandage for the sensitive skin of newborns and elderly patients.

Gene delivery tool

The use of gene therapy to cure diseases like cancer could become reality with the help of a tool developed at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Signglasses

Google Glass adaptation opens the universe to deaf students

Stem cell shorts

StemCellShorts is a series of succinct, animated videos that introduce basic concepts in stem cell research.

Heroes made the difference: Peter Agre, M.D.

Peter Agre is a 2003 Nobel Laureate in Chemistry. He is also the Director of the Johns Hopkins Malaria Research Institute and a professor at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

NSF Science Now: Episode 23

In this week's episode we discover the earliest and most primitive pterodactyloid. We learn about a new device for diagnosing pancreatic cancer. We study the cougars' diet and finally we explore a science & engineering festival.

Biodiversity: A boon for brain research

How two unlikely microbes (that don't even have brains) led to the development of one of today's most promising brain research techniques--which is being used to study many diseases including schizophrenia and Parkinson's.

No clowning around: Juggling study shows us how senses help us run

Juggling may sound like mere entertainment, but a study led by Johns Hopkins engineers has used this circus skill to gather critical clues about how vision and the sense of touch help control the way humans and animals move their limbs in a repetitive way, such as in running.