Medical Sciences

Medical Sciences advance the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of disease, but they also help us prevent disease in the first place. Too numerous to name, the medical sciences continuously make miraculous breakthroughs that extend lifetimes and expand our ability to experience life.

Episode 13: Part of the pack

In this week's episode, Jordan and Charlie chat about the importance of a pack, discover a new antibody that may combat urinary tract infections and chase down storms with Doppler on Wheels.

Forensics: Follow the science

Forensic science is an integral part of the American judicial process--essential to both prosecutions and defenses. However, the field has also come under scrutiny. A briefing on May 12 at the Rayburn House Office Building on Capitol Hill, sponsored by the National Science Foundation and the American Psychological Association, highlighted how the use of the scientific method can inform the field of forensics and ways to improve judicial system outcomes through evidence-based inquiry.

Episode 12: Bioprinting

In Episode 12, Charlie and Jordan chat about 3-D bioprinting, plugging up leaky graphene and a new approach to learning for the Pre-k crowd called Connect4Learning.

Episode 8: Go with your gut

In Episode 8, Charlie and Jordan chat about the many different species of gut microbes, explore how math is helping ovarian cancer research and investigate the smell coming from water pipes in West Virginia's Elk River area.

The computational biology of cancer

Endometrial cancer affects 48,000 women per year in the United States. For patients with tumors greater than two centimeters in diameter, the effected organ(s) and lymph nodes may be surgically removed. Yet post-surgery analysis shows that only 22 percent of patients had metastasis, meaning 78 percent of these surgeries may have been unnecessary. How can doctors predict which patients need surgery?

Magnetic organ retractor

A team of engineers are using magnetic force to design new and improved instruments for minimally invasive surgery. The use of magnetic actuation allows them to create tools that are more flexible and more powerful than conventional designs, which place the instruments on the end of long sticks. The first device of this type that they have designed is an organ retractor that repositions organs like the liver when required for an operation. They are also applying this approach to create new laser and radio-frequency scalpels.

Applied biosensors

NSF-funded small business Applied Biosensors has created sensors that continuously monitor multiple biomarkers. The core technology has implications for biomedical research, water quality management and metabolic monitoring, among others.