Medical Sciences

Medical Sciences advance the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of disease, but they also help us prevent disease in the first place. Too numerous to name, the medical sciences continuously make miraculous breakthroughs that extend lifetimes and expand our ability to experience life.

First smartphone app that can hear ear infections in children

With funding from the National Science Foundation's Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE), researchers at the University of Washington have created a new smartphone app that can detect fluid behind the eardrum by simply using a piece of paper

How to test for fake drugs

A new product, developed at the University of California, Riverside, could make access to detection technology a viable and inexpensive reality for these areas

NSF Science Now: Episode 63

In this week's episode, we learn about developable mechanisms that reside in curved surfaces of structures; explore wrist bone motion using 3D technology; and, finally, examine Adelie penguins' past and future. Check it out!

Scoping out capillaries using 3D

National Science Foundation-funded researchers at Northwestern University have developed a 3D imaging tool that gives researchers a rare glimpse at the more than 40 billion, tiny, hair-like vessels called capillaries

NSF Science Now: Episode 62

In this week's episode, we explore 3D technology to look inside capillaries; learn about a new species of dinosaur with a heart-shaped tail; and, finally, we examine a new kind of thinking cap for online learning

3D printed objects that can track and store information

Vikram Iyer, doctoral student in the University of Washington's Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, demonstrates 3D printed devices that can track and store information about their use without using batteries or electronics

NSF Science Now: Episode 60

This week's episode examines an engineering breakthrough in Type 1 diabetes that could help dogs and humans alike; targeted reading programs that rewire the brains reading circuitry; and finally, explores hidden ice history discovered beneath the West Antarctic Ice Sheet

Why can it be so hard to decide on lunch?

A new study conducted at reveals new insights into choice overload, including the parts of the brain responsible for it and how many options the brain actually prefers when it is making a choice

Smart prosthetic ankle takes fear out of rough terrain

A new prosthetic ankle, developed by a team at Vanderbilt University, has a tiny motor, actuator, sensors and chip that work together to either conform to the surface that the foot is contacting or remain stationary, depending on what the user needs

Can scientists sequence DNA in 100 seconds?

Researchers are developing new methods for sequencing entire strands of DNA from humans or bacteria in just 100 seconds, which could lead to transformative advances in biology and medicine

'Non-smoking' doesn't mean smoke-free

Despite decades of indoor smoking bans and restrictions, new research from Drexel University suggests the toxins we've been trying to keep out are still finding their way into the air inside

The genetic path to biodiversity

With support from the National Science Foundation, developmental biologist Arnaud Martin and his team at George Washington University are using cutting-edge genomic techniques, such as CRISPR, to better understand how the rich stripes and swirls of a butterfly's wing take their shape

Butterfly cam catches cancer

National Science Foundation-funded researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Washington University in St. Louis have developed a surgical camera inspired by the eye of the Morpho butterfly to more accurately find lurking cancer

A cheaper, easier way to test for Malaria

For many in sub-saharan Africa, finding out if a fever is due to Malaria often means trekking long miles to a clinic for a relatively pricey blood test, and anxious hours of waiting before the results come in -- the Urine Malaria Test kit developed by Fyodor Biotechnologies has begun to change all that

Cellular shuffle

Researchers at the University of Washington and the Allen Institute for Brain Science have developed a new method to classify and track the multitude of cells in a tissue sample

Understanding the gut microbiome

Larry Smarr and Rob Knight hope to help make the three P's of modern medicine - precision, predictive and personalized -- a reality with the aid of advanced computers to create high-resolution mapping and simulations like never before

Why study mouse lemurs?

The Duke Lemur Center's non-invasive research on mouse lemurs, our tiny primate cousins, could help explain the initial stages of Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases

Can tiny medical implants treat disease?

Tiny electronic devices, sometimes called electroceuticals, could be placed alongside vital organs in the human body to take sensor readings, deliver tiny amounts of drugs, provide remedial jolts of electricity or combinations of the above

Oil mixes with water

The reluctance of oil and water to mix together and stay that way is so well-known that it has become a cliché for describing any two things that do not go together well

Fighting brain drain with a game

One of the two brain-training methods most scientists use in research is significantly better in improving memory and attention, Johns Hopkins University researchers found

NSF Science Now: Episode 54

In this week's episode, we discover why some bumblebees are in peril and that some of the earliest primates were adept leapers. We also explore a new technique that can print drugs, and learn about a new app capable of detecting concussions right on the sideline

Walk this way!

National Science Foundation-funded researchers at Carnegie Mellon University developed a technique that can dramatically improve mobility for millions of people who currently use prosthetic limbs and exoskeletons to walk

Relief from Parkinson's

Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have discovered two groups of neurons that can be turned on and off like a light switch to alleviate the movement-related symptoms of Parkinson's disease for longer periods of time

Cognitive and neural benefits of teaching spatial thinking

This behavioral and neuroimaging study investigates the effects of spatial education embedded in a science class on the core spatial abilities and science, technology, engineering and mathematics-relevant spatial thinking of high school students

Electromagnets unwire the framework of small, foldable robots

A team of researchers at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and the John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) at Harvard University has created battery-free folding robots that are capable of complex, repeatable movements powered and controlled through a wireless magnetic field

NSF Science Now: Episode 52

In this week's episode, we discover why freshwater lakes are becoming saltier and the role temperature plays in the spread of mosquito-borne diseases, explore a new device for combatting Parkinson's disease, and finally, learn how to excite girls about STEM

Nuclear CSI

In episode 73, Jordan and Charlie investigate a new procedure for identifying individuals exposed to uranium within the past year. Scientists and homeland security experts believe these procedures could identify individuals who may be smuggling nuclear materials for criminal purposes.

Silk proteins for more stable vaccines

Almost all vaccines on the market require refrigeration to remain viable, including during transport. Continuous cooling is expensive and especially challenging in developing countries. To solve this problem, Vaxess Technologies Inc. has developed a technology that uses silk proteins to create more stable biological platform that keeps vaccines from degrading when exposed to higher temperatures.

A color-based, disposable anemia test

Two billion people worldwide have iron deficiency anemia, a condition in which blood lacks adequate healthy red blood cells needed to carry oxygen to tissues. Left untreated, anemia can lead to severe health problems. To help people monitor their blood-iron levels more easily, Sanguina LLC, a small business funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), has developed a color-based anemia test.

An augmented view

Researchers are applying augmented reality to improve ultrasounds for both patient and physician

NSF Science Now: Episode 47

In this week's episode, we learn about new tools to protect against malicious websites, restoring the sense of touch to amputees and those with paralysis and examine how older adults really hear.

New 'Neural Dust' sensor could be implanted in the body

University of California, Berkeley engineers have built the first dust-sized, wireless sensors that can be implanted in the body, bringing closer the day when a Fitbit-like device could monitor internal nerves, muscles or organs in real time.

NSF Science Now: Episode 45

In this episode, we tested out a computational design tool that transforms flat materials into 3-D shapes, a virtual reality environment that is helping autistic teens learn to drive, a new novel underwater microscope and, finally, "smart thread" for wirelessly monitoring the health of a wound.

To purify a virus

A new theory about virus surfaces--that they're hydrophobic--has opened up new processes to improve vaccine production, potentially making them more affordable around the world.

How can mussels improve fetal surgery?

University of California, Berkeley, engineer Phillip Messersmith is happy to be learning lessons from a lowly mollusk, with the expectation that the knowledge gained will enable him and fellow physicians to prevent deaths among their youngest patients -- those who haven't been born yet.

NSF Science Now: Episode 44

In this week's episode we examine electric eels, test out a new at home screening test for people on blood thinner, learn about a new app for reporting floods and finally examine how RoboBee uses static electricity to stick to surfaces.

Strut your stuff

In episode 52, Jordan and Charlie discuss research discovered using new high-resolution microscopy by a team at the University of Pennsylvania. Molecular struts, called microtubules, interact with the heart's contractile machinery to provide mechanical resistance for the beating of the heart.

Nifty 50

Jordan and Charlie celebrate 50 episodes with 50 National Science Foundation-funded breakthroughs, discoveries, achievements and generally amazing contributions to science.

Treating strokes with chemistry

In episode 49, Charlie and Jordan talk about a molecule that can inhibit an enzyme linked with the onset of stroke. The molecule -- developed by research teams at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and the National University of Singapore -- reduced the death of brain tissue by as much as sixty-six percent when given to a rat that had recently suffered a stroke.

'Go Baby Go!' Mobility for kids with disabilities

The exploration experiences that children have at an early age play an important role in cognitive development. A research team from the University of Delaware, led by physical therapy professor Cole Galloway, is working on ways to help infants with walking and crawling issues have those kinds of experiences.

Micro-fabrication for cochlear implants

Angelique Johnson is the CEO of MEMStim, a company that is innovating how electrode arrays in cochlear implants are manufactured. Using automated micro-fabrication, instead of costly hand-made manufacturing, Johnson is able to lower the cost of production, allowing more people in need of implants to afford them.

Contact tracing

What is Contact Tracing, and how does it help control the spread of deadly, infectious diseases?

Examining DNA to understand disease

Sridhar Hannenhalli, a professor of cell biology and molecular genetics at the University of Maryland, uses computational biology to understand how specific genes turn on and off, and how those changes could lead to cancer.

Paying attention to neglected diseases

Najib El-Sayed, an associate professor of cell biology and molecular genetics at the University of Maryland, fuses wet bench experimentation with sophisticated computer analysis to gather and interpret large amounts of genetic data.

Science of Innovation: Origami structures

Origami is the ancient Japanese art of paper folding. But to engineer Mary Frecker of Pennsylvania State University, it is the future for designing tools that could be used in fields such as medicine and space exploration.

No bones about it

In episode 44, Charlie and Jordan explore how engineers are studying the way bones heal in order to make materials last longer.

Sensoring our sleep

This video profiles the project "Research to Quantify the Health and Development of Children with Disabilities Around the Clock"

Science of Innovation: 3-D bioprinting

Adam Feinberg at Carnegie Mellon University has come up with a technique that expands the use of 3-D printing technology and could one day allow researchers to print heart tissue.

Artificial organs go for a spin

In episode 42, Jordan and fill-in co-host Laurie talk about cotton candy machines that have been repurposed to make artificial capillary networks. The artificial capillary system the researchers were able to produce using this method kept living cells viable and functional for more than a week, a huge improvement over current methods.

NSF Science Now: Episode 40

In this episode we create an ice storm lab, discover gravitational-waves, track the path of chemo drugs and, finally, test out new deep-sea ROV grippers for handling fragile coral and sponges.

Cell Talk

In episode 40, Charlie and Jordan demonstrate how the cells responsible for relaying information from the ear to the brain adapt to noise levels in an environment

Engineering tissues to rebuild bodies

Tissue engineering - a rapidly growing field revolutionizing how physicians treat injury and recovery, thanks to game-changing advances in engineering, materials science and biology

How do you feel? Video of your face may tell all

Researchers are developing a highly accurate, touch-free system that uses a video camera to monitor patients' vital signs just by looking at their faces. The technique isn't new, but engineering researchers are making it work under conditions that have so far stumped earlier systems.

The spectacular science of 2015

In episode 38, Charlie and Jordan highlight as many National Science Foundation-funded news stories as they can in one minute, including--but certainly not limited to--water on Mars, the woolly mammoth genome, smart band-aids and a new species of dinosaur.

Burn notice

In episode 36, Charlie and Jordan discuss the potential Band-Aid of the future.

Bite-sized robots

In episode 35, Charlie and Jordan explore new open-source medical capsule robots' hardware and software. Researchers around the globe who want to customize medical capsule robots won't have to start from scratch anymore.

Biotech's future: 3-D printed human cells

Nano3D Biosciences Inc., a small business funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program, is using a magnetic 3-D bioprinting technology to re-imagine cell culture models and tissue printing engineering.

Kiss of death

In episode 26, Charlie and Jordan delve into the discovery of water on Mars, chat about a new Ebola field test and explore the immune system's "kiss of death."

Bacterial litmus test measures micronutrients

A bacterium engineered to produce different pigments in response to varying levels of a micronutrient in blood samples could give health officials an inexpensive way to detect nutritional deficiencies in resource-limited areas of the world.

A better tool for minimally invasive surgery

University of Michigan (UM) engineers, in collaboration with the UM Medical School, have developed a new affordable tool technology which will make performing minimally invasive surgery easier for surgeons.

NSF Science Now: Episode 36

In this week's episode, we discover a protein that could someday eliminate malaria, learn about microbes battling it out in Antarctica, explore super Wi-Fi that uses UHF channels and virtually unwrap a 1500-year-old scroll.

Clearing feeding tubes faster: biotech's future

Feeding tubes often become clogged with medication and food, depriving patients of nutrition. National Science Foundation-funded small business Actuated Medical has invented an FDA-approved device that clears clogs quickly and cleanly. Roger Bagwell demonstrated how the device works at the 2014 BIO International Convention.

ApneApp

ApneaApp is a solution for detecting sleep apnea events on a smartphone.

The pentaquark

In episode 20, Charlie and Jordan chat about rising sea levels, biodegradable "smart" implants and the existence of the pentaquark.

Woolly mammoth

In episode 19, Charlie and Jordan delve into a study of mammoth proportions, chat about a new 3-D printed soft robot and an advance in breast cancer research.

An in-mouth wafer to treat oral cancer

To treat oral cancer, NSF-funded small business Privo Technologies has created a platform that delivers treatments directly to the affected area. Privo develops new classes of targeted treatments, such as chemotherapy drugs, designed to be delivered through the mouth's mucous membranes.

Research makes a difference

This video highlights three Princeton University researchers who are striving to improve people's lives through innovations in science and engineering. Their research topics include blood sugar monitoring, computer interaction and genes related to cancer.

Revolutionizing prosthesis prescription

Steve Collins of the Mechanical Engineering Department at Carnegie Mellon University discusses his lab's work in creating robots that are worn on the leg to help people get around.

Solar cycles

In episode 17, Charlie and Jordan chat about wastewater catalysts, solar cycle disruptions and an "iron shield" for rice.

Mysteries of the brain: thinking brain

Through neural connections, called synapses, the brain can process and store enormous amounts of information. Neuroscientist Gary Lynch at the University of California-Irvine explains how this incredibly complex communication process allows animals to learn and remember.

Mysteries of the brain: brain-computer interface

Neuroengineer Rajesh Rao of the University of Washington is developing brain-computer interfaces or devices that can monitor and extract brain activity to enable a machine or computer to accomplish tasks, from playing video games to controlling a prosthetic arm.

Mysteries of the brain: perceiving brain

Sabine Kastner, a professor of neuroscience and psychology at Princeton University, is studying how the brain weeds out important information from everyday scenes. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, Kastner is able to peek inside the brain and see what areas are active when a person sees a face, place or object.

Mysteries of the brain: Building a brain

Carlos Aizenman, a neuroscientist at Brown University, is studying the brains of tadpoles to understand how neural circuits develop and absorb information from the surrounding environment.

Mysteries of the brain: brain states and consciousness

Neurobiologist Orie Shafer at the University of Michigan is trying to understand how the brain's cells communicate in order to control sleep patterns. To help solve this mystery, Shafer is teaming up with mathematician Victoria Booth to study a tiny and unlikely specimen: the fruit fly.

Mysteries of the brain: emotional brain

For years, researchers have struggled to understand how emotions are formed and processed by the brain. Now, neuroscientist Kevin LaBar and his graduate students at Duke University are using a virtual reality room to study how the brain reacts to both negative and positive emotions.

Mysteries of the brain: evolving brain

Using amazing new technologies, evolutionary neuroscientist Melina Hale and her graduate students at the University of Chicago are discovering that the basic movements in one tiny fish can teach us big ideas about how the brain's circuitry works.

Mysteries of the brain

For centuries, scientists and engineers have studied the brain and yet, how it works largely remains a mystery. Understanding the brain means knowing the fundamental principles underlying brain structure and function. Explore the mysteries of the brain with investigators who span the spectrum of scientific and engineering disciplines. "Mysteries of the Brain" is produced by NBC Learn in partnership with the National Science Foundation. For more information, please visit: http://www.nsf.gov/brain/.

SMART Shoes

It may look like an insole, but this Smart Shoe system developed at the Mechanical Systems Control Lab at the University of California, Berkeley, could help physical therapists get their patients walking better, faster.

Walking assist clutch

Assistant professor for mechanical engineering at Carnegie Mellon University: Steve Collins, discusses his research published in Nature in which he and his colleague have developed an unpowered, untethered exoskeleton (the walking assist clutch) to help people walk with 7 percent less effort. This can be of tremendous help to people who walk for hours a day or who have disabilities.

Part of the pack

In episode 13, Jordan and Charlie chat about the importance of a pack, discover a new antibody that may combat urinary tract infections and chase down storms with Doppler on Wheels.

Forensics: Follow the science

Forensic science is an integral part of the American judicial process--essential to both prosecutions and defenses. However, the field has also come under scrutiny. A briefing on May 12 at the Rayburn House Office Building on Capitol Hill, sponsored by the National Science Foundation and the American Psychological Association, highlighted how the use of the scientific method can inform the field of forensics and ways to improve judicial system outcomes through evidence-based inquiry.

Leaky graphene

In Episode 12, Charlie and Jordan chat about 3-D bioprinting, plugging up leaky graphene and a new approach to learning for the pre-k crowd called Connect4Learning.

Go with your gut (microbes)

In Episode 8, Charlie and Jordan chat about the many different species of gut microbes, explore how math is helping ovarian cancer research and investigate the smell coming from water pipes in West Virginia's Elk River area.

The computational biology of cancer

Endometrial cancer affects 48,000 women per year in the United States. For patients with tumors greater than two centimeters in diameter, the effected organ(s) and lymph nodes may be surgically removed. Yet post-surgery analysis shows that only 22 percent of patients had metastasis, meaning 78 percent of these surgeries may have been unnecessary. How can doctors predict which patients need surgery?

Magnetic organ retractor

A team of engineers are using magnetic force to design new and improved instruments for minimally invasive surgery. The use of magnetic actuation allows them to create tools that are more flexible and more powerful than conventional designs, which place the instruments on the end of long sticks. The first device of this type that they have designed is an organ retractor that repositions organs like the liver when required for an operation. They are also applying this approach to create new laser and radio-frequency scalpels.

New technology makes tissues, someday organs

A new device for assembling large tissues from living components could someday be used to build replacement human organs the way electronics are assembled today: with precise picking and placing of parts.

Self-powered device measures lung function - CES 2015

A portable device powered by a simple breath can measure lung function and transmit results to your phone. The 3-D printed device is designed to enable people with lung conditions, such as asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), to gauge their lung function without having to visit a clinic.

Catching up on sleep science

Be honest: Do you ever brag about how little sleep you get? If so, you're not alone. Humans are the only species that seems to deliberately deprive themselves of sleep. But if you've ever uttered a phrase like, "I'll sleep when I'm dead," scientists say it's time for a wake-up call.

Catching up on sleep science

It's time to wake up to the importance of sleep. Groundbreaking 2013 research shows that our brain cells shrink while we sleep, allowing a cleansing fluid to rinse away toxic proteins that lead to Alzheimer's. Sleep also "backs up" important memories into the brain's cortex for long-term storage. Learn about how sleep changes as we age, and why getting enough sleep is so critical for health.

Expansion Microscopy brings the brain in 3-D into focus

Illuminating the brain and nervous system is one of today's greatest engineering challenges. A new technique called expansion microscopy uses chemicals commonly found in baby diapers to swell mouse brain tissue samples with water to nearly five times the usual size, with little distortion.

Organs on a chip

Organs on a chip systems could transform the medical drug pipeline as we know it. Biomedical engineer Ali Khademhosseini explains how he and his team at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology are engineering tissues outside of the human body and connecting different "organs" to solve some pressing challenges.

Engineering a smart Band-Aid

What does it take to engineer a smart Band-Aid? Biomedical engineer Ali Khademhosseini walks us through the future of Band-Aids, and how he and his team at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology are testing them.

Surprising new role for calcium in sensing pain

Researchers have made a surprising discovery in worms about the role of calcium in pain signaling. They have built a structural model of the molecule that allows calcium ions to pass into a neuron, triggering a signal of pain. These discoveries may help direct new strategies to treat pain in people.

Antibiotic resistant bacteria

An engineer's research to understand how bacteria and antibiotics interact in the environment may one day help reduce the danger of antibiotic-resistant bacteria to the public

Stent research

The cure for a serious heart condition could be found with the help of research at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Gene delivery tool

The use of gene therapy to cure diseases like cancer could become reality with the help of a tool developed at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Signglasses

Google Glass adaptation opens the universe to deaf students

Stem cell shorts

StemCellShorts is a series of succinct, animated videos that introduce basic concepts in stem cell research.

Heroes made the difference: Peter Agre, M.D.

Peter Agre is a 2003 Nobel Laureate in Chemistry. He is also the Director of the Johns Hopkins Malaria Research Institute and a professor at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

NSF Science Now: Episode 23

In this week's episode we discover the earliest and most primitive pterodactyloid. We learn about a new device for diagnosing pancreatic cancer. We study the cougars' diet and finally we explore a science & engineering festival.

Biodiversity: A boon for brain research

How two unlikely microbes (that don't even have brains) led to the development of one of today's most promising brain research techniques: optigenetics, which is being used to study many diseases including schizophrenia and Parkinson's.

No clowning around: Juggling study shows us how senses help us run

Juggling may sound like mere entertainment, but a study led by Johns Hopkins engineers has used this circus skill to gather critical clues about how vision and the sense of touch help control the way humans and animals move their limbs in a repetitive way, such as in running.

NSF Science Now: Episode 22

In this week's episode we discover hidden dangers in crib mattresses. We learn about a new stretchable antenna for wearable health monitoring devices. We study the dynamics of deep Earth and finally we explore Antarctic ice sheets from above.

Spherical nucleic acids

The floating golden sphere, bristling with corkscrew strands of RNA, drifts majestically toward the jostling lipid bilayer that surrounds a cell

NSF Science Now: Episode 21

In this week's episode we discover the oldest fossil evidence of modern, venomous snakes in Africa. We discover what was going on in the earliest moments of our universe just after the Big Bang, and finally we learn about a new weather radar network in Texas.

Chemistry of fear and fright

"Chemistry of Fear and Fright" explains how two hormones, adrenaline and cortisol, work to trigger a cascade of "fight or flight" fear responses when you're confronted by a spider, great height or snake.

Peter Stang: Building molecules

Peter Stang is the winner of the 2013 American Chemical Society Priestley Medal, the highest honor given by ACS, for his work building new molecules via "self-assembly," an approach inspired by nature.

Why Science? Mapping Disease

Andy Tatem, an assistant professor at the University of Florida Emerging Pathogens Institute, explains why he selected a career in scientific research, which was a path from childhood to the university level and beyond.

Eliminating Malaria In Zanzibar

Andy Tatem, an assistant professor at the University of Florida's Emerging Pathogens Institute, explains his role in attempting to convince Zanzibar of the need to prevent malaria.

NSF Science Now 13

This week's episode of NSF Science Now highlights new primate fossil discoveries in Tanzania, the first screening method to detect the early presence of ovarian cancer, a polymer material that more efficiently utilizes solar energy and finally research to gather the most detailed 3-D mapping ever of the Galicia Rift off the coast of Spain.

Peter Wolynes: Untangling Protein Folding

Peter Wolynes, winner of the 2012 ACS Award in Theoretical Chemistry, spent his career untangling the process of protein folding and discovered a process through which these chain molecules tumble into shape. His discovery may help usher in new techniques for personalized medicine and reveal how protein mutations affect the body.

Science Of Innovation: Biometrics

A method for capturing and analyzing the vein patterns in the white part of the eye to help identify people. Biometrics has potential applications for driver's licenses, passports or computer identification control.

Origami Chemistry: NYU Professor Folds Molecules

21st Century Chemist Kent Kirshenbaum of New York University engineers and folds synthetic peptoids in hopes of creating "hunter-killer" molecules that can target and destroy deadly bacteria like staph (MRSA).

NSF Science Now 12

This week's episode highlights Vanderbilt University's humanoid robot geared to help children with Autism Spectrum Disorder, University of Michigan researchers harnessing terahertz technology that could one day help doctors see deep into tissues without the damaging effects of x-ray, Rice University discovery that rocks in the earth's mantle beneath the ocean floor melt much deeper than previously thought and finally, Blue Waters, one of the world's most powerful supercomputers is now available for use nationwide. It's unparrelled processing power enables researchers to perform large-scale scientific applications at the cutting edge of computational science.

Climate, Weather, And Health

hat's a medical anthropologist doing at an atmospheric research center? NCAR's Mary Hayden describes efforts to understand the connections between climate, weather, and health.

Interactive Robot Helps Children With Autism

What if a robot could help children with autism learn? That's the question researchers at Vanderbilt University wanted to answer by developing an interactive robot with the help of some young children with autism.

Science Behind The News: Bio-Inspired Materials

In the search for the next groundbreaking tough material, scientists like David Kisalus from the University of California, Riverside are looking to nature for inspiration, including under the sea where one little crustacean packs a walloping punch - the peacock mantis shrimp.

Science Of Innovation: Electronic Tattoo

A micro-electronic health monitor so thin, light and portable that it can attach right to the surface of skin and go wherever a person goes. This innovation has the potential to revolutionize the field of healthcare technology.

Wearable Robot Helps Paraplegics Walk

Vanderbilt University researchers have developed a 'remarkable' wearable robot that helps some paraplegics get out of their wheelchair and walk again, even going up and down stairs. A Middle Tennessee man shares his emotional story from the life-altering accident to standing up and walking again, using the new robotic prototype.

Baby Brainpower

A variety of UC Berkeley research on babies and young children is revealing how well and how early in life humans are able to perform complicated thinking tasks, sometimes better than computers. In fact, scientists are even trying to develop computer programs that can mimic what's going on in babies' brains.

Science of Innovation: Bionic Limbs

Professor Homayoon Kazerooni is a robotics engineer at the University of California, Berkeley with more than 40 patents to his name. His research on exoskeletons relies on more than just ingenuity and engineering expertise, it's also an example of how inspiration can play a part in the innovation process, the simple desire to help other humans.

Genomics Of Autism Spectrum Disorders

Three talks and a Q&A panel discussion featuring experts on ASD from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Drexel University and the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.

NSF Science Now 6

In this week's episode of NSF Science Now we explore climate change and the Colorado River, helping children with disabilities, porcupine's quills, and finally the decline of chinstrap penguins.

NSF Science Now 5

In this week's episode of NSF Science Now we explore negative thoughts, robotic fish, sensitive alligators and finally the discovery of a camp used by explorers a century ago during the "Heroic Age" of Antarctic exploration.

NSF Science Now 3

In this week's episode of NSF Science Now we explore NSF's Harvard Forest Long-Term Ecological Site, phytoplankton and climate change, how silver turns people blue and finally why math hurts.

Cancer And Our Genome: Insight And Hope

This lecture and discussion featured cancer experts Drs. Chi Van Dang (Abramson Cancer Center, Penn), Yael Mosse (Children's Hospital of Philadelphia), Katherine Nathanson (Penn), Anil Rustgi (Penn) and Ashani Weeraratna (Wistar).

New Drugs – From A Cup Of Tea

Chemist works towards the creation of new drugs using peptides that will treat the health problems of millions of people across the globe

Understanding Viruses

Where do these Viruses occur in nature, how many of them are there, and how do they switch into new hosts?

Science Behind The News: Tomato - Decoded

The size, shape, skin thickness, color and taste of tomatoes are all traits determined by their genes. Now, scientists from 14 nations, including the U.S., have sequenced the tomato genome ¿ the order and location of the tomato's 35,000 genes.

Science Behind The News: Allergies

Seasonal allergies affect more than 40 million Americans each year. Plant biologist Dr. Kristina Stinson of Harvard University explains how allergies affect the body, and why warmer weather could lead to longer, more severe allergy seasons.

Jewels In The Mud

A marine biomedicine pioneer leads explorations of the oceans to battle drug resistance and disease.

Concussion Research

University of Nebraska-Lincoln researchers work with Nebraska athletes to learn more about concussions

Bend It Like NIST

It may sound like the stuff of science fiction but at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), nanosoccer is serious business.

An Insulin That Can Take The Heat

A major health challenge for people living in tropical and subtropical regions of the developing world is the "cold chain," the need to refrigerate certain vaccines and drugs, particularly insulin.

Science Behind The News: Influenza & Flu Vaccines

Every flu season, Americans battle coughs, fevers and body aches. The flu is a respiratory illness caused by a virus, a pathogen that causes disease in the human body. To understand how the flu is caught, spread and treated, Duke University's Katia Koelle explains the biology of a virus and how it is transmitted.

Heart Valve Disease Research

Researcher Kristyn Masters and her team study heart valve disease and gender differences in the disease. By making models of the disease, they hope to test potential treatments.

Preparing Surgeons For The Operating Room

Ioannis Pavlidis, director of the Computational Physiology Laboratory at the University of Houston, and Dr. Barbara Bass, chair of the department of surgery at The Methodist Hospital, teamed up with the help of an NSF grant in hopes of better preparing surgeons for the operating room by measuring the role of stress on a surgeon's path to competency.

Vision Reconstruction

Using Hollywood movie trailers, UC Berkeley researchers have succeeded in decoding and reconstructing people's dynamic visual experiences.

Virus Evolution

Michigan State researchers show how new viruses evolve, and in some cases, become deadly

Cell Scope

Lightweight, mobile microscopes are not only being used in third world countries to diagnose disease, but also in classrooms to get kids excited about science.

Chemistry of fear and fright

Are you arachnophobic? Acrophobic? Ophidiophobic (afraid of snakes)? "Chemistry of Fear and Fright" explains how two hormones, adrenaline and cortisol, work to trigger a cascade of "fight or flight" fear responses when you're confronted by a spider, great height or snake.

Electronic Tuning Fork

Electronic tuning fork takes the guesswork out of determining how much sensitivity a patient has lost

GSI: Gait Study Investigators

Everyone has a distinct gait pattern that's all their own and like a fingerprint, it can provide important clues to solve a mystery.

Sound Safety

Research suggests a cause, and potential solution for listener fatigue caused by in-ear headphones.