K-12 & Education

It's a competitive world in which science, technology, mathematics and engineering impact our economy, health, societal well-being and policy. Scientists, engineers and educators provide the ideas and knowledge base for U.S. leadership in science and engineering. Learning how people learn, while also supporting the very best ideas and students are also essential goals in today's changing world.

Why Science: forestry

In this video, University of Florida professor Tim Martin explains his work in the woods.

Why Science? Extension and education

Martha Monroe, a professor and extension specialist at the University of Florida, talks about her career in environmental education and learning about and providing tools for educators to successfully engage and teach students.

The IBM selectric typewriter

Slow motion video shows how the mechanical digital-to-analogue converter of IBM's revolutionary "golf ball" typewriter works

Summer Systematics Institute

The Summer Systematics Institute addresses critical issues such as, world-wide threats to biodiversity, the origins and diversification of life, phylogenetic systematics and evolutionary biology, which have become critical components of undergraduate education.

Kids outsmart grown-ups

Preschoolers can be smarter than college students at figuring out how unusual toys and gadgets work

Introduce a Girl to Engineering Day

What makes a superhero a superhero? Learn about how some real-life superheroes at the USC Viterbi School of Engineering are using their special powers to save people and make their lives better everyday.

The fish detective!

Kate talks to Cara Simonsen, a marine biologist, about stalking fish in the name of science

Change the world: Science and engineering careers fair

For two days in September, Congressman Frank Wolf and the National Science Foundation (NSF) hosted a fair at the Dulles Town Center in Virginia that inspired young people to consider careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

NSF Science Now: Episode 15

This week's episode of Science Now highlights the University of Minnesota's mind controlling robot that could potentially help people who are paralyzed or have neurodegenerative diseases, PolarTREC's FishSpy camera capturing life beneath the frigid waters surrounding Antarctica, a shake table test on the world's largest shake table and finally the discovery of the earliest European fort found in the foothills of North Carolina.