K-12 & Education

It's a competitive world in which science, technology, mathematics and engineering impact our economy, health, societal well-being and policy. Scientists, engineers and educators provide the ideas and knowledge base for U.S. leadership in science and engineering. Learning how people learn, while also supporting the very best ideas and students are also essential goals in today's changing world.

Catching up on sleep science

It's time to wake up to the importance of sleep. Groundbreaking 2013 research shows that our brain cells shrink while we sleep, allowing a cleansing fluid to rinse away toxic proteins that lead to Alzheimer's. Sleep also "backs up" important memories into the brain's cortex for long-term storage. Learn about how sleep changes as we age, and why getting enough sleep is so critical for health.

Catching up on sleep science

Be honest: Do you ever brag about how little sleep you get? If so, you're not alone. Humans are the only species that seems to deliberately deprive themselves of sleep. But if you've ever uttered a phrase like, "I'll sleep when I'm dead," scientists say it's time for a wake-up call.

Bolstering our food banks

The number of people going hungry in North Carolina has soared to more than one in six. Among children, the number is one in four. It often falls to the state's nonprofit food banks to provide relief from that food insecurity.

Origins of bird species

In a landmark study that researched the origins of bird species, evolutionary biologists have made discoveries about the age of birds, and the genomic relationships among modern birds.

NSF Science Now: Episode 29

In this week's episode we discover a new genetic toolkit for achieving increased plant production, explore what our brain is doing when we read, discover ways of making a more reliable prosthesis, and, finally, we learn how researchers are working to better forecast the size of future earthquakes and tsunamis. Check it out!

Last few orbits of a binary black hole merger

This is a physically accurate gravitational lensing visualization of the last few orbits of a binary black hole merger. The camera is above the orbital plane of the merger, looking down.

Why Science: forestry

In this video, University of Florida professor Tim Martin explains his work in the woods.

Why Science? Extension and education

Martha Monroe, a professor and extension specialist at the University of Florida, talks about her career in environmental education and learning about and providing tools for educators to successfully engage and teach students.