Earth Scope Chronicles

EarthScope is a multifaceted program investigating the internal structure, dynamics and history of the North American continent.

Meet a geophysicist

Postdoctoral Research Fellow from Arizona State University, Harmony Colella, talks about how experiencing an earthquake as a child in Southern California inspired her to become a geophysicist.

Meet a geophysicist: Danielle Sumy

When she was very young, Danielle Sumy's experience on the Earthquake ride at Universal Studios launched her quest to understand how earthquakes happen. Here she describes how this encounter and her early love of science motivated her to become a geophysicist.

Meet a geophysicist: Kathy Davenport

As a graduate student in geophysics, Kathy talks about her involvement with the Idaho - Oregon Research Project (IDOR) and explains why she likes her work. Kathy was part of a team from Virginia Tech supervised by John Hole, one of the IDOR Principal Investigators.

Meet a geophysicist: Jenny Nakai

Jenny Nakai talks about her interest in engineering and science as a means to be useful and solve problems and the importance of education in the Navajo culture in general.

Volcano research: Emily Hooft

Emilie describes her work as a geophysicist, the physics she uses to better understand the forces that make volcanoes work, and how seismic data can help image the magma structures beneath them

Plate boundary observatory overview

In this overview of the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), Glen Mattioli, director of geodetic infrastructure at UNAVCO, provides an overview of its important activities and impact.

The SPREE project overview

The SPREE Project (Superior Province Rifting Earthscope Experiment) is using data from multiple seismometers placed along transects in Wisconsin, Minnesota, and Canada to study a failed rift system.

Idaho-Oregon Research project overview

The Idaho - Oregon Research Project (IDOR) is combining data from multiple sources, including research on gravity, seismology, structural geology and geochronology, to study a boundary that occurred on the edge of North America between Idaho and Oregon.

The IDOR Project: Meet the geology team

The IDOR Project (Deformation and Magmatic Modification of a Steep Continental Margin, Western Idaho - Eastern Oregon) is combining data from multiple sources, including research on gravity, seismology, structural geology, and geochronology to study a boundary that occurred on the edge of North America between Idaho and Oregon.

The IDOR project: Geology in the lab

The IDOR Project (Deformation and Magmatic Modification of a Steep Continental Margin, Western Idaho - Eastern Oregon) is combining data from multiple sources, including research on gravity, seismology, structural geology, and geochronology to study a boundary that occurred on the edge of North America between Idaho and Oregon.

The IDOR project: Geology in the field

The IDOR Project (Deformation and Magmatic Modification of a Steep Continental Margin, Western Idaho - Eastern Oregon) is combining data from multiple sources, including research on gravity, seismology, structural geology, and geochronology to study a boundary that occurred on the edge of North America between Idaho and Oregon.

The IDOR project: Meet a seismologist

The IDOR Project (Deformation and Magmatic Modification of a Steep Continental Margin, Western Idaho - Eastern Oregon) is combining data from multiple sources, including research on gravity, seismology, structural geology, and geochronology to study a boundary that occurred on the edge of North America between Idaho and Oregon.

The IDOR project: Seismology in the field

The IDOR Project (Deformation and Magmatic Modification of a Steep Continental Margin, Western Idaho - Eastern Oregon) is combining data from multiple sources, including research on gravity, seismology, structural geology, and geochronology to study a boundary that occurred on the edge of North America between Idaho and Oregon.

The IDOR project: Meet the gravity team

The IDOR Project (Deformation and Magmatic Modification of a Steep Continental Margin, Western Idaho - Eastern Oregon) is combining data from multiple sources, including research on gravity, seismology, structural geology, and geochronology to study a boundary that occurred on the edge of North America between Idaho and Oregon.

The IDOR project: gravity fieldwork

The IDOR Project (Deformation and Magmatic Modification of a Steep Continental Margin, Western Idaho - Eastern Oregon) is combining data from multiple sources, including research on gravity, seismology, structural geology, and geochronology to study a boundary that occurred on the edge of North America between Idaho and Oregon.

The great shakeout earthquake simulation

Geophysicists and seismologists discuss the potential of earthquakes in North America, particularly around the San Andreas Fault in California. Some of the dynamics and rating scales for earthquakes are discussed, and the physical effects of major earthquakes in the western United States are simulated.

The Great California ShakeOut day

Geophysicists discuss earthquakes and the San Andreas Fault system at the San Bernadino County Museum, Redlands, California. Emergency reactions to a violent earthquake are displayed.

Marine geology research

Geophysicist Danielle Sumy discusses her research on mid-ocean ridges and on tremors created by small earthquake events.

Slow slip event research

Postdoctoral Research Fellow from Arizona State University, Harmony Colella, explains the potential importance of slow-slip events in predicting larger earthquakes and how she uses earthquake data and computer modeling techniques to study them.

Rio Grande rift project

Jenny Nakai talks about her research, which involves using data from the EarthScope Transportable Array to study seismicity in the Rio Grande Rift region.

The Gulf Coast Repository core collection

Phil Rumford, supervisor of curation, Gulf Coast Repository, provides a guided tour of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program's Gulf Coast Repository facility at Texas A&M University, in College Station, Texas.

San Andreas Observatory at Depth overview

In this overview of the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth project (SAFOD), Judith Chester, professor of geology at Texas A&M University, explains the efforts involved in drilling a three kilometer deep hole into the San Andreas Fault and the importance of the results to the scientific community.

The SAFOD core in the lab

Judith Chester, professor of geology at Texas A&M University, describes how drill cores from San Andreas Observatory at Depth project (SAFOD) are stored at the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program's Gulf Coast Repository facility on the university campus in College Station, Texas.