Computer-equipped dogs lead way in search-and-rescue

Researchers from North Carolina State University show off pioneering work demonstrating the potential of technologies that allow dogs to gather information, and stay safe, during search and rescue operations. Among the applications they're testing are computer-assisted training, remote communication with dogs in the field and tools to help people with guide dogs better understand what their dogs are doing. They accomplish these tasks by equipping dogs with video, audio and gas sensors (in the case of emergency response), as well as inertial measurement units that provide information in real time about the dog's posture and physiological monitors. The last type of capabilities that they are working on enables handlers to communicate with dogs from afar. Using audio cues and haptic inputs (like the vibration on a phone), they are training dogs to respond to different commands in the field or around the house.

Provided by the National Science Foundation

Runtime: 3:01

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